Recap OES Mandala Garden Program Session 3

Author:
Garima Goel
June 4, 2022

On the Sunday morning of 29 May 2022, kids came to the OES Children’s Farm campus to learn new things about farming. They were prepared for the morning, to begin with, farm activities and lots of fun.

All of them came to the mandala garden area and wished their coach Garima Goel affectionately. They went to their respective patches to have a look at the tiny plant growth. This made them extremely happy. 

To begin the third session of Mandala Garden farming, coach Garima briefed them about all planned activities for the day. Having this information kids went to the respective patches and started weeding the weeds out. There were not many weeds in the Mandala Garden sections, as the kids have been weeding here every Sunday, since sowing. So as soon as the weeds were out, children geared up for the next activity- harvesting Beetroot microgreens. Beetroot seeds were sown 2 weeks back. In 15 days, time the beetroot seeds had germinated and reached the microgreen stage. They looked very beautiful with two small leaves on top of a small & slender pink stalk. Garima demonstrated harvesting these with a pair of scissors. Kids waited for their turn with scissors and were prompt to follow suit. Each of them harvested a bunch full of Beetroot microgreens and showed them to their parents, happily.

Soon it was time for an exciting activity, putting pest control in place. Since OES practices only natural farming, kids were asked to drench their respective farm patches with fermented and diluted butter milk solution. The coach demonstrated how to pour this pest control liquid using mug and hands. The children followed instructions well. Having done this, it was time for harvest, kids went to OES farm area, where there was Okra (Bhindi), Mint and Gongura ready for harvest. Kids tried harvesting bhindi from almost camouflaged plants, having nice big vegetables hidden within leaves. It was a bit itchy for them to get inside and pluck the Bhindi out of the vegetable farm beds. But they took it in their own stride. Harvesting mint was pleasurable as before, having done this during the first session. They filled the harvest bags with these vegetables and came up to their farm coach. There was more in store for them. The next activity was to use the Jeevamrutham solution that the children had prepared during the last session. They all first diluted Jeevamrutham to 1:10 with water. This liquid is a biofertilizer and helps in pest control as well. It was sprayed on the bhindi farm beds uniformly. 

By then it was time to wash up and get ready to go back home. Some kids had brought their snacks with them to eat after all the hard work at the farm. They enjoyed every bit of this experience.

About Organo Et School (OES)

We recognize that for any positive impact to be sustainable, it must be long-term and inter-generational. Organo Et School strives to create an apt learning environment that will support and empower families as well as individuals to embrace sustainable living mindsets and habits.

Organo Et School is a learning initiative set up by Organo in 2017 and has been facilitating field visits and workshops for Schools and Interest Groups. Organo Et School has had over 25+ schools, 6500+ students and 2800+ adults participate over the last 5 years.

We believe in connecting children & adults with nature. Connecting children with the natural world at a young age is the first step in creating responsible stewards for our collective future.

If you or your children are interested in future Be a Farmer program, please contact us at oes@organo.co.in and by phone 9154100775 today! You can also click here to express your interest. We will keep you posted on our future farm cycles.

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